MCALLEN, Texas – South Texas College board trustee Dalinda Gonzalez-Alcantar says her college stands ready to assist Chinese-based companies wishing to “near-shore” to Mexico.

Gonzalez-Alcantar gave her thoughts after reading a New York Times story by reporter Peter S. Goodman titled ‘OK, Mexico, Save Me’: After China, This Is Where Globalization May Lead.

The story cites the example of Walmart, which needed $1 million worth of company uniforms – more than 50,000 in one order. It bought them not from its usual suppliers in China but from Preslow, a family-run apparel business in Mexico.

Isaac Presburger is director of sales at Preslow and is based in Mexico City “Walmart had a big problem with their supply,” Mr. Presburger recounted. “They said, ‘OK, Mexico, save me.’”

Gonzalez-Alcantar said: “As we head into 2023, the possibilities are endless for the Rio Grande Valley and South Texas College is ready to assist with near-shoring. There is already so much STC is doing bi-nationally so implementation is possible.”

STC currently helps maquiladoras based in Reynosa with workforce training.

Again referring to the NYT story, Gonzalez-Alcantar later added: “As a trustee for South Texas College, this news is outstanding for the Rio Grande Valley and our vecinos to the south. In fact, STC is already doing work bi-nationally with the maquilas and will be poised to support near-shoring.”

Gonzalez-Alcantar first offered her commentary on social media site LinkedIn. She was responding to a post from Glenn Hamer, executive director of the Texas Association of Business. 

Linking to the NYT’s story, Hamer lifted these statistics from Goodman’s piece: 

“During the first ten months of last year, Mexico exported $382 billion of goods to the United States, an increase of more than 20 percent over the same period in 2021, according to U.S. census data. Since 2019, American imports of Mexican goods have swelled by more than one-fourth. About $450 billion or two thirds of the goods produced in Mexico that enter the US come through Texas.”

Here is the opening to the NYT story:

News Clip

‘OK, Mexico, Save Me’: After China, This Is Where Globalization May Lead

By Peter S. Goodman

NEW YORK TIMES: As American companies seek to limit their exposure to the pitfalls of making goods in China, some are moving production to Mexico.

The unfolding trend known as “near-shoring” has drawn the attention of no less than Walmart, the global retail empire with headquarters in Arkansas.

Walmart needed $1 million of company uniforms — more than 50,000 in one order — it bought them not from its usual suppliers in China but from Preslow, a family-run apparel business in Mexico.

Early last year, when Walmart needed $1 million of company uniforms — more than 50,000 in one order — it bought them not from its usual suppliers in China but from Preslow, a family-run apparel business in Mexico.

It was February 2022, and the contours of global trade seemed up for alteration. 

The worst pandemic in a century had upended shipping. The cost of transporting products across the Pacific had skyrocketed, and ports were choked with floating traffic jams — a stark indication of the dangers of depending on a single faraway country for critical goods.

Among multinational companies, decades of faith in the economic merits of making things in China had come under withering challenge, especially as animosity intensified between Washington and Beijing.

At his office in Mexico City, Isaac Presburger, director of sales at Preslow, took Walmart’s order as a sign of his country’s evolving role in the economy, and the opportunities that flow from sharing the same side of the Pacific with the United States.

“Walmart had a big problem with their supply,” Mr. Presburger recounted. “They said, ‘OK, Mexico, save me.’”

Editor’s Note: Click here to read the full story in The New York Times.

Editor’s Note: The main image accompanying the above news story shows Dalinda Gonzalez-Alcantar. (Photo credit: Texas State University)


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